FLOURIDE

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WHAT IS FLOURIDE?

Fluorine (F-) is a trace mineral and has the atomic number 9.  Fluorine containing compounds are extensive because of fluorine’s ability to form compounds with all the elements except for helium and neon.  Some fluorine containing compounds are extremely toxic and others are life saving.

Inorganic fluorine compounds are called fluorides.  Fluorides are found in very low concentrations in drinking water and in food. 

 

THE JOURNEY 

JOURNEY-FOR-FLOURIDE

WHAT DOES FLOURIDE DO FOR US?

 

Fluorides are known to prevent tooth decay and more fluoride is added to drinking water to protect our teeth.

 

In pharmaceuticals fluorides are used to reduce excessive drug metabolism.

 

Fluoride salts are often used as phosphatase enzyme inhibitors.  Blocking enzyme activity can often kill pathogens or correct metabolic imbalances.   Many drugs are used as enzyme inhibitors.

 

WHAT HAPPENS WHEN WE DON’T GET ENOUGH FLOURIDE?

 

There is an increase in tooth decay in areas where there is virtually no fluoride in the drinking water.

 

There is no apparent effect on osteoporosis.

 

 

WHAT HAPPENS WHEN WE GET TOO MUCH FLOURIDE?

 

Sodium fluoride salts are known to be toxic and have resulted in accidental  and suicidal deaths.  The lethal dose for adults is about 5 to 10 grams but a dose of 4 grams has been known to cause death and higher doses have had survivors.  The death process may take anywhere from 5 minutes to 12 hours.  A horrible way to go.

 

WHERE DO WE GET FLOURIDE?

TABLE-FOR-FLUORIDE

 

FACTOIDS

Live Science Reports on the status of flouride in drinking water as follows:

 

http://www.livescience.com

Within the last 15 years, research has revealed that fluoride primarily works topically, such as when it applied to the teeth in fluoride-rich toothpaste. People opposed to fluoridation have argued out that since this is true, it needn’t be added to water. Today people are exposed to many more sources of fluoride than when it was first introduced in the 1940s — the first fluoridated toothpaste, Crest, wasn’t introduced until 1955.

A 2009 study that tracked fluoride exposure in more than 600 children in Iowa found no significant link between fluoride exposure and tooth decay. Another 2007 review in the British Medical Journal stated that “there have been no randomized trials of water fluoridation,” which is currently standard for all drugs.  

 

 

 

REFERENCES

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluoride

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002420.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phosphatases

http://chemistry.about.com/od/medicalhealth/a/lowerfluoride.htm

Ways to reduce fluoride exposure.

 

http://www.fluoridealert.org/content/fresh_foods/

www.cdc.gov/fluoridation/pdf/pollick.pdf